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 1 
 on: Today at 10:09:27 AM 
Started by wreckit87 - Last post by hondaracer2oo4
I haven't had time to read over the manual yet but here it is.

http://www.dunkirk.com/sites/default/files/Q90-100%20Series%20Conversion%20Kit%20Instructions%20DSI%20to%20HSI.pdf

 2 
 on: Today at 09:56:29 AM 
Started by wreckit87 - Last post by wreckit87
So I piped an OWB into a guy's existing system yesterday. Boiler loop heats a 20 plate, Taco 007 draws hot water from the plate, through a mixer, into a Lennox Q90-100 LP boiler which serves an 8 loop radiant system. Now, I've done this dozens of times before and left the wiring up to someone smart, it works out fine but I've never seen a boiler like this Lennox that has no setpoint control. The only aquastat is a high limit, and when operating the boiler puts out 120 degree water and short cycles every 90 seconds or so. I turned the mixing valve up to 130 thinking it'd cut out the gas burner while the stat continued to spin the pump, which it did once the supply water had reached temp. Problem is though, that the inducer fan never shuts off. And every 5 minutes or so, the igniter would light up and gas valve open, fire the burner for 3 seconds and then shut down again.

Given the insulation quality and size of the loops, I want to run 100ish degree water through the mixer instead of 130. At that, the gas burner will want to run all the time. Dude wants to keep the Lennox in operation if possible as a backup and to keep the OWB loop from freezing up if need be, so adding another stat to power the pump only was all my feeble mind could produce. He wants to do the electrical himself, so I was wondering if any of you gentlemen could explain this to me so I have some insight on what to tell him. I'm at a loss. Thanks in advance

 3 
 on: Today at 09:48:53 AM 
Started by mlappin - Last post by mlappin
Well sometimes the internet isnít completely full of crap. Found a fifty pound bag of silica sand, threw a couple of cupfuls in the hole in the wall, turned water down to a trickle, ran the bit in, did that two or three times then it finally started cutting. Found anytime it seemed like feed speed was dropping off, bring it back out and some sand in the hole, some more in the bit itself. With the trickle of water when the sand did start to come out it would pack a little around the core bit and act as a dam to keep more slurry in the hole. Went 5 inches or better repacking the hole with sand about every inch, finally got thru the rock then speed picked up drastically once it was cutting part rock, part mortar. Probably had a rock in the wall 10-12 inches in diameter and of course thatís where I decided to drill.

 4 
 on: Today at 09:19:47 AM 
Started by RSI - Last post by wreckit87
Sorry, I had something completely different in my noggin for some reason. You are correct, it would go straight back to the HX. I still stand by using 3 pumps with individual manifolds to keep the loops separated, mostly due to the fact that if the sole pump decides to take a crap, nobody gets any water... I just like to ensure that everything is separated and self sufficient, plus I don't like the idea of the actuators. Cost would be in the same ballpark either way, with a lot less wiring and clutter IMO. My $.02 aren't really important though, if you're content with it by all means do it up!

 5 
 on: Today at 08:50:36 AM 
Started by Scratch - Last post by Scratch
If you ever replace it the 007 is really undersized for that long of a loop. A 0015 3 speed would do better. Or 15-58 Grundfos, B&G NRF22 or 25, etc. The 007 is a low head pump which drops velocity down to where air could possibly hang in any high spot.
Anyway, glad you got running, it's getting cold weather.
Thanks, I think I'll check into one of those and get a couple for spares. Anyone have any suggestions for where to find one at a low cost online?

 6 
 on: Today at 07:10:15 AM 
Started by Scratch - Last post by E Yoder
If you ever replace it the 007 is really undersized for that long of a loop. A 0015 3 speed would do better. Or 15-58 Grundfos, B&G NRF22 or 25, etc. The 007 is a low head pump which drops velocity down to where air could possibly hang in any high spot.
Anyway, glad you got running, it's getting cold weather.

 7 
 on: Today at 04:14:59 AM 
Started by mlappin - Last post by E Yoder
Yeah, you're in a different thing with granite.

 8 
 on: Today at 03:21:55 AM 
Started by heat550 - Last post by E Yoder
Great point. The soil surrounding the line often gets ignored.

 9 
 on: October 17, 2017, 05:33:26 PM 
Started by heat550 - Last post by coonsrich@yahoo.com
Trench heat loss can be quite variable. It should not be very deep. Keep the trench as dry as possible. A wet trench will draw the heat away from the headed pipe and heat the surrounding ground. Drain the bottom of the trench with perferated drain pipe cover with 6 inches of 1 inch gravel. Place a heavy vapor barrier in the 18 inch wide trench and add 6 inches of 1 inch gravel.  Place heating pipe in middle and cover with another 6 inches of 1 inch gravel.  All gravel near heat pipe should be kept dry to act as insulation. Cover with vapor barrier and 4-5 inches of soil. The pipe with the highest R value is well worth the extra cost if you want to burn less wood.

 10 
 on: October 17, 2017, 05:19:46 PM 
Started by mlappin - Last post by mlappin
We have one of those as well, both the bosch hammer drill and dad has a 5 inch core bit, works fine in concrete or block, forget it in field stone. I bought a brand new Bosch four flute carbide bit for the rotary hammer, the granite just laughed at it. Iím using a 1/2 diamond core bit to get the anchors in, if the plug doesnít break off at the bottom of the hole, then the new bit in the rotary hammer will shatter the stone as deep as the diamond bit went then nothing.

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