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Author Topic: E1450 performance question  (Read 845 times)

boilerman

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Re: E1450 performance question
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2018, 09:19:51 PM »

smithbr i have a length of rebar that I poke the firebox airchannel holes open with if necessary a couple of times a week. Pay special attention to the lower holes so any creosote in channels can run back into firebox. I've found that 1-4 inches of coals covering the air charge tube in firebox gets me the highest burn temps. When cleaning reaction chamber I always give the thermocouple a tug to make sure it is fully extended into chamber. Clean rear exchanger tubes as necessary. Primary elbow can be cleaned twice a season or so by some, but I only need to do at the end of the season. I've also raised the primary solenoid so cover gap is an extra 1/4" higher than owners manual specs. Puts more air in firebox and helps push down into reaction chamber better.
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smithbr

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Re: E1450 performance question
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2018, 07:00:43 PM »

Thanks, Boilerman.  We keep those tube openings clean.  Haven't checked the elbow since startup this fall, so I'll look at that.  Haven't messed with the thermocouple, didn't realize it was prone to moving, so I'll do that next cleanup.

Good idea on the solenoid, but I'll do that as a controlled experiment, when I can change only that and see if there's an effect over the next 48 hours running. 

Cleaned it today, and a bit more charcoal in the reaction chamber than usual, but as I said earlier, the edges of the firebrick below the charge tube look very good, so I don't think they've degraded much; I was thinking that if they had, I'd just turn them around to put a 'virgin' edge back into service, see if it makes a difference, but I don't believe there's enough difference to warrant it.

We'll see.  I'm still getting the occasional Stage 3 burn, but also some Stage 2, and lots of demand cycles never get out of Stage 1; yet they complete within 15-20 minutes (175 ->190, with 3-5 degrees overshoot).  So I don't think things are running poorly.  My wood is certainly not what I'd like to be burning, so that may be a factor as well. Just wish I'd had the wifi remote last year, so I could do some longer term comparisons.
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Pointblank

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Re: E1450 performance question
« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2018, 05:54:19 PM »

How green is your wood? Those reaction temps seem pretty low. Is the stove gasifying well? Any blue smoke visible from the chimney once its up and running? With good seasoned hardwoods I see 1000-1200 degree burns with my Edge.
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Central Boiler Classic Edge 550
Previous- Central Boiler 5648- 13 years

Minnesota

smithbr

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Re: E1450 performance question
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2018, 07:24:04 PM »

Hi Pointblank
Stage 1 <550; Stage 2 550->750; Stage 3 >750.  We occasionally see temperature peaks between 800 and 850, no higher.  The higher the demand, the better the burn, because it runs for longer before hitting the high cutoff.
That being said, I have a real suspicion we're running higher than that TC is measuring, because we're not going creosote-solid.  We're generating more creosote than last year, by a long shot.  My wood is cut 4 years, left in block until last spring, split, and stacked in an open shed.  So six months of open air circulation.  The 4 years in block didn't  do much drying, mostly grew fungus.  Last year's wood had shed dried for three years, so it was almost too dried. 
I know, this year's is horrid wood by any reasonable standard, but it's what I've got right now.  Next year's wood will be similar, but mixed 50-50 with two-year-dried poplar, so things should improve.  Then I'll hit the thee year wood cut last year in the year after that.
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