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 1 
 on: Today at 07:38:07 PM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by mlappin


So how do these things work. say its cold out and the thermostat calls for heat.. how does the thermostat relay that message to the outdoor furnace??? or does it even work that way? (remember I am BRAND new to this thing ,sorry)

And if the EPA banned wood furnaces.. why are there so any out there? Which leads me to the next question.. which ones should I look at that are decent and wont break the bank?



The boiler  could care less what the house is doing, when the water temp drops to the preset point it starts and heats the water to the hi set point.

The EPA didnít ban wood furnaces, only those that canít meet emission standards.

 2 
 on: Today at 05:28:05 PM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by shepherd boy
 Should be no problem to hook to that gas pack with a outdoor boiler. 30' is usually what I hear from a insurance company, and you should for your own benefit as well. Just looked at a place today that had a outdoor furnace in a shed, burned it down with 13 cord of wood and got their detached garage as well. We will be installing a new unit where the old one was only this one is not going inside the proposed woodshed. Lucky it was 70' from the house or it would have gotten the house as well.

 3 
 on: Today at 03:02:54 PM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by A.O.
Thanks Guys... Pretty lax about regs around here but I'll look into it.

So the "coal" units burn wood good yes? i'm a little short of coal trees around here. ;-)

So how do these things work. say its cold out and the thermostat calls for heat.. how does the thermostat relay that message to the outdoor furnace??? or does it even work that way? (remember I am BRAND new to this thing ,sorry)

And if the EPA banned wood furnaces.. why are there so any out there? Which leads me to the next question.. which ones should I look at that are decent and wont break the bank?

And I was leaning to the boiler type, but just doing my research..

 4 
 on: Today at 11:55:41 AM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by E Yoder
I've never heard anything about SC having any state regs on outdoor furnaces, just the EPA regs like anywhere.
. And welcome AO, glad to have you.

 5 
 on: Today at 11:50:30 AM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by E Yoder
As wreckit said tieing in with a hot water wood boiler is very simple and straightforward, a hot air unit is not as easy to regulate or connect. But obviously I live in the wood boiler world and don't know the hot air units as well..
I'd get it at least 30' away for fire safety and no chimney extension headaches. I'd like to see pictures of the supply duct under the house. Can usually put a coil in right after it comes to the wall before any flex ducts come off. Dimensions would be great.

 6 
 on: Today at 09:41:42 AM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by wreckit87
Welcome to the page! First things first, you'll want to talk to your insurance company about it. Most companies (in my area anyway) require an outdoor unit to be 50+ feet from any insured structure. They may have grace for a brick building, but you'll definitely need enough flue to get above the roof line if you're that close to the house. As for the forced air units, there are a few out there that are happy with them but there is typically quite a bit of loss out the stack from the ones I've seen. Do you know if you are allowed a coal stove in SC? As of 1-1-16, the US federal government banned any wood furnace not EPA certified, which limits you to gasification units or coal furnaces. Some states will not allow coal furnaces altogether though. The non-stoker coal furnaces still burn wood just fine, very well in fact, but technically it is illegal to do so (if the unit was made after 1-1-16) and the MFG is supposed to void your warranty if you are caught burning wood in a coal unit. I would push toward a boiler, but which type of boiler is up to you and your local regulations. A simple underground lineset and an air to water heat exchanger in your existing ductwork with a pump circulating water would be a relatively easy retrofit and still maintain the gas pack as backup. With the boiler you can also heat your domestic water as long as the boiler is burning, using the same pump and just adding another exchanger for the water heater. Hot water heat is among the most versatile in the industry

 7 
 on: February 23, 2018, 11:48:50 AM 
Started by A.O. - Last post by A.O.
Hi, This is my first post here, bear with me.

I am looking to get a Outdoor wood burning furnace, I know absolutely nothing about these other than they have to be cheaper to run than my propane "gas pack"!! 

So I live out in the country in a house built in 1954 in South Carolina, I've done a lot of work on the place, put a foot of insulation in the attic, and had the entire exterior of the house bricked partially to eliminate the drafts and such, but mostly for looks I guess. I have what they call a gas pack for a furnace on the outside of the house which is what I'm thinking is a perfect set up for an outside wood burner. I have no shortage of wood to burn, in fact just ordered a small sawmill so I'll have lots of cutoff too boot! And I can set this thing within 10 feet of that gaspack (closer even if I have to.

I just am iunsure how to go about this or where to start even. Do I get a boiler type, or a hot air ducted unit. Or does it matter? I talked to my local HVAC guy and he wasnt much help so I figured this would be a good place to learn.

Here is that gas pack furnace heat and air





 8 
 on: February 23, 2018, 07:21:14 AM 
Started by Jon_E - Last post by wreckit87
Good Lord, give it a rest and get a life. Both of you.

Some of us work with this stuff for a living and have a bit of a "need" to know where their products come from. When it's been the general consensus for many years that your product comes from one place and you are suddenly told otherwise, wouldn't you want to know so you can share correct information with your customers and forum-goers alike? This is my "life" that you've so eloquently demanded I get, so if you don't mind I'm going to sit here and wait for my answer- per your instruction

 9 
 on: February 23, 2018, 01:36:41 AM 
Started by Super44 - Last post by Farmer Rob
Dayton 4C446 is the spare I have.
Hello Sir on a side note I noticed your also from Ontario.Might I ask how you like the P&M unit and approx wood use per season. I am from the Dundalk area(west of Barrie)

 10 
 on: February 22, 2018, 10:53:56 PM 
Started by d5knapp - Last post by d5knapp
What shows will P & M be at around Michigan???

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