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 1 
 on: Today at 07:14:32 PM 
Started by heat550 - Last post by FrozenMongrel
Sometimes you don't have much of a choice. I had to put weight on my logstor to get it to sink to the bottom of my trench when I installed it because my water table is about 12" down from the level of my yard. I backfilled with the existing dirt that I dug out as gravel would simply allow the water to stay against the pipe. It would become the drainage path for all the water from the back of my house to the boiler. I buried a drain pipe below the logstor from my foundation drain to hopefully catch most if not all the flow of water from around my house, but I know the water table is extremely high in my area. I have a friend a couple miles away that has a 25' deep shallow well that has never gone dry in the most severe drought since it was put in back in the early 1900's. We're along a river and it's all old clay river bed. Absolutely no drainage through it, water just sits on it and flows under the surface down to the river. Total loss over ~60' is less than 1F I don't think I'll get any better than that.

 2 
 on: Today at 11:01:08 AM 
Started by E Yoder - Last post by E Yoder
A customer gave me permission to post this of his G200 and wood shed. A whole years supply of split locust in the dry. That'll be pretty sweet come January and the wind is howling.

 3 
 on: Today at 10:42:28 AM 
Started by Heyjohnj - Last post by E Yoder
You want the most heat output possible from any type of exchanger right? Let's start with a flat plate- your incoming boiler water let's say is 180 degrees but your domestic input is only 55 degrees. If they're in parallel flow, your hottest boiler water is in contact with the coldest domestic water. The domestic will leech heat from the boiler water, so when it leaves the plate, your boiler water is only let's say 150. If the boiler water is only 150 on that end of the plate, your domestic simply cannot be any higher than 150. Now counterflowed, that 150 degree boiler water on the output of the plate is in contact with the 55 degree domestic. Are you with me still? Think of this a a preheat of sorts. Now as the domestic travels through the plate, it picks up more and more heat because the boiler input is still at 180. So once the domestic is exiting the plate, it's in contact with 180 degree boiler water, so if flows are correct, you can essentially have 180 degree domestic to fill your tank with.

Same goes for the air to water exchanger in the furnace plenum. That boiler water entering the top (updraft furnace) of the coil cools on its way down through the coil because the air is leeching that heat. But at the top, said air is already "preheated" and the last fin the air sees is in contact with 180 water again so if the stars align you could have 180 degree air instead of 150. Know what I mean?
:post:

 4 
 on: Today at 10:37:25 AM 
Started by Scratch - Last post by E Yoder
Supplyhouse.com, EBay.

 5 
 on: Today at 06:53:32 AM 
Started by heat550 - Last post by WoodMOJoe
Definitely want to use clean gravel (not base rock with a lot of fines) under, around and over your lines.

Crushed limestone or clean screened creek gravel (if it is sized also) works well.

I have heard of people using sand (not sure if it was lime sand or river sand) but I would not recommend that.

Sand retains moisture much longer than crushed stone/clean gravel, you need something that the moisture can pass through.

What is available locally varies though of course but it's worth seeking out whatever will work best.

 6 
 on: October 18, 2017, 11:07:34 PM 
Started by wreckit87 - Last post by RSI
I was just looking at the manual an may be worth trying to just turn off the economy mode and turn temp down.
It looks like the high limit is just the water temp control.
Turning off economy mode will just make it run a fixed 10 degree differential.

 7 
 on: October 18, 2017, 09:30:19 PM 
Started by wreckit87 - Last post by wreckit87
I just glanced through the manual and it looks like the high limit controls the temp. I think it says it is adjustable up to 190.
I would think if connections are accessible, you could connect to the output of the high limit control. You would need to know if it opens or closes when it hits the set point.
If it closes then just connect aquastat in parallel. If it opens then you would need to connect in series.

This should make it think that it is always up to full operating temperature whenever the owb is hot and go back to normal operation when the owb pipe is cold.

Hmmmm... I'm wondering what the point of a high limit is if it doubles as the setpoint? Wouldn't it go out on HL every time it reached temp? That's how others I've played with have worked anyway. The HL is more of a redundancy thing in case the setpoint control fails. I think. My other concern is that the HL aquastat on this boiler was set at 160. Setpoint according to the temp gauge was 120 right on the nuts with a 10 degree differential. I don't see how the HL stat can operate a setpoint 40 degrees less than its own setpoint but still serve as a HL. Probably just ignorance at its best here, but I'd really like to understand it

 8 
 on: October 18, 2017, 09:21:45 PM 
Started by Heyjohnj - Last post by wreckit87
You want the most heat output possible from any type of exchanger right? Let's start with a flat plate- your incoming boiler water let's say is 180 degrees but your domestic input is only 55 degrees. If they're in parallel flow, your hottest boiler water is in contact with the coldest domestic water. The domestic will leech heat from the boiler water, so when it leaves the plate, your boiler water is only let's say 150. If the boiler water is only 150 on that end of the plate, your domestic simply cannot be any higher than 150. Now counterflowed, that 150 degree boiler water on the output of the plate is in contact with the 55 degree domestic. Are you with me still? Think of this a a preheat of sorts. Now as the domestic travels through the plate, it picks up more and more heat because the boiler input is still at 180. So once the domestic is exiting the plate, it's in contact with 180 degree boiler water, so if flows are correct, you can essentially have 180 degree domestic to fill your tank with.

Same goes for the air to water exchanger in the furnace plenum. That boiler water entering the top (updraft furnace) of the coil cools on its way down through the coil because the air is leeching that heat. But at the top, said air is already "preheated" and the last fin the air sees is in contact with 180 water again so if the stars align you could have 180 degree air instead of 150. Know what I mean?

 9 
 on: October 18, 2017, 07:58:19 PM 
Started by Heyjohnj - Last post by braveblaster
When hooking the heat exchangers up, for a flat plate you want your boiler water flowing the opposite direction as your domestic water. If your domestic enters the top and exits the bottom, then you want your boiler water to enter the bottom and exit the top. Same concept in the furnace, the air should be exposed to the hottest water as it leaves the heat exchanger. If the air is entering from the bottom, then your water from the flat plate or side arm should enter the port of the furnace exchanger that will have it flowing thru the top first and exiting the bottom.

Could  you please expand on theory/reason behind this?

No doubting nor question it just trying to expand my knowledge, thanks!

 10 
 on: October 18, 2017, 07:01:18 PM 
Started by wreckit87 - Last post by RSI
I just glanced through the manual and it looks like the high limit controls the temp. I think it says it is adjustable up to 190.
I would think if connections are accessible, you could connect to the output of the high limit control. You would need to know if it opens or closes when it hits the set point.
If it closes then just connect aquastat in parallel. If it opens then you would need to connect in series.

This should make it think that it is always up to full operating temperature whenever the owb is hot and go back to normal operation when the owb pipe is cold.

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