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 1 
 on: Today at 02:31:50 AM 
Started by Farmer Bob - Last post by E Yoder
The only other thing I can think of is the possibility of a stand tube corroded or broke loose allowing it to suck water from down low.


Maybe some other guys have better ideas.

 2 
 on: Today at 02:24:41 AM 
Started by MaverickM23 - Last post by E Yoder
I burned a Chinook back in 2010 I think, so my memory might be getting fuzzy. That was the winter I was snowed in several weeks and I was digging wood for the Chinook with a skid steer, so it does stand out. :)
Anyway, if I'm remembering right the Chinook 200 had 3 nozzles crossways in the floor. If you could cut that pattern out of some thick 409 like mlappin said I think it could greatly extend the life of the brick. I cut something similar out of 10 gauge 409 and burned for one winter just to see what would happen and it oxidized and got wider right at the hole, but lasted one winter.
I don't think any dealer would have the brick for your model in stock as it's completely different than the current design of the G200. But I'm sure one could be cast to fit.

 3 
 on: October 17, 2018, 06:42:41 PM 
Started by MaverickM23 - Last post by mlappin
Has anyone ever tried making a metal piece that covers the holes to help wearing on the brick? Like cut a plate that fits directly over the firebox floor? This is the third year for this stove and the bricks are worn out already.

Iíve thought about it, would like to find a 3/8" or 1/2" plate of 409 to cut it from.

 4 
 on: October 17, 2018, 02:25:18 PM 
Started by Farmer Bob - Last post by Farmer Bob
A couple of days with rain and a freezer that quit has kept me from getting back here.  Trailmaster, I agree with you.  Restrictions in my house circulation could effect water circulation in the furnace water jacket.  However, I have diverter valves allowing me to bypass either or both (air) heat exchangers as well as the (plate type) heat exchanger for hot water, (which has given me infrequent blockage issues).  Only the in-line filter is constantly in the flow path.  In this chapter I have plumbed the 011 pump so it sources water from one of the 3/4 inch hot outlets (top) and traveling only a few inches is fed to a return port (bottom); still having the 009 pump driving circulation to the house (sounds like E.Yoder's suggested set-up).  I expected to have full 185 degree water circulating in the water jacket being driven by the 011 pump with additional 009 circulation.  After running for 24 hours, FireStar reading 179 degrees, water outlet temperature 160 degrees.  I pulled the 011 pump cartridge to check its operation; it spun freely (powered and by hand), with no signs of corrosion or blockage.


I have no idea what I could try next . . .  I look forward to your thoughts.  Has anyone else checked outlet water temperature of an E-Classic 2400?

 5 
 on: October 17, 2018, 08:40:23 AM 
Started by MaverickM23 - Last post by MaverickM23
E Yoder thanks for the number if my local guy does not have one I will contact you.

 6 
 on: October 17, 2018, 08:39:31 AM 
Started by MaverickM23 - Last post by MaverickM23
I contacted Heatmaster directly and they would not sell me one, said I had to go through a dealer. I contacted my local dealer and am going tonight to look at one he said might work. I also asked Heatmaster if they had a parts diagram for the stove and they said they did not. Has anyone ever tried making a metal piece that covers the holes to help wearing on the brick? Like cut a plate that fits directly over the firebox floor? This is the third year for this stove and the bricks are worn out already.

 7 
 on: October 17, 2018, 02:14:42 AM 
Started by MaverickM23 - Last post by E Yoder
877 325 9792

 8 
 on: October 16, 2018, 06:44:41 PM 
Started by Roger2561 - Last post by Pointblank
I put a Schlage keypad deadbolt on my main entry door and a non-locking door knob.  I don't need a key to get in the house, ever.  The battery has needed replaced once, but that was evident by the door not wanting to lock as the battery got low.  I also keep a key hidden in my detached garage that is always unlocked, just in case.

We installed one of these last year. They work great.

Any idea how they hold up on sub-zero temperatures?  Here in NH it can get mighty cold.  Roger

Hi Roger,

Ours worked good last winter with some nights getting close to -30. However, there is a storm door installed, which I imagine would help keep it a bit warmer. Also, the batteries and locking mechanism are on the inside of the door. The only thing exposed to the cold, as far as I know, is the keypad. I believe its a kwikset brand iirc.

As far as the wood boiler, ya, we fired it up about a week and a half ago. Been a fairly cool and damp fall here in MN with highs only in the 40's so I lit it up. Seems to be a week or two ahead of schedule compared to years past.
I bet your looking forward to starting up your new Edge. Its always fun to try out a new piece of equipment.
-Greg

 9 
 on: October 16, 2018, 02:40:10 PM 
Started by Roger2561 - Last post by juddspaintballs
We don't usually dip below zero here, but we had a couple weeks of single digits last year and it worked just fine.  The electronic components are on the inside of the door. 

 10 
 on: October 16, 2018, 07:28:55 AM 
Started by Roger2561 - Last post by Roger2561
I put a Schlage keypad deadbolt on my main entry door and a non-locking door knob.  I don't need a key to get in the house, ever.  The battery has needed replaced once, but that was evident by the door not wanting to lock as the battery got low.  I also keep a key hidden in my detached garage that is always unlocked, just in case.

We installed one of these last year. They work great.

Any idea how they hold up on sub-zero temperatures?  Here in NH it can get mighty cold.  Roger

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