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 11 
 on: June 18, 2018, 05:14:34 PM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by greasemonkoid
That's a good idea ^.  Yes there is a circulator pump running constantly. I also dropped the Ranco T-stat down a hair to 182. It overshoots by 3 degrees, but I've also got the fans that turn on at 185 and that pulls it back down a degree, then it slowly cools off and is stable.

A couple of spare squirrel cage combustion fans came in last week, it looks as if there could be a bit of leakage in the sheet metal housing also. I'll get up there and smoke it later this week and see what happens, in fact, right now the datalogger would probably reveal some good info. I'll post that up after a 24 hour log.

 12 
 on: June 18, 2018, 09:16:25 AM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by E Yoder
Another method I've used is to shut the draft off right in the middle of a real hard burn. Then wait a minute or two for the firebox to pack full of smoke all the way down into the ash pan, then cap the chimney with a board and turn the draft back on, it'll puff smoke out of any crack even in the ash pan.

 13 
 on: June 18, 2018, 07:26:06 AM 
Started by d5knapp - Last post by Rockarosa
I bought the MP 7300 last Friday. Got the conditioner and a section of pipe, and delivery.  Did a little negotiating and got what I thought was a good deal.

 14 
 on: June 18, 2018, 07:06:31 AM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by mlappin
Soon as it shuts off, a swisher sweet or something smokey makes a great way to check for air leaks. Just move it around the door, ash pan, shaker grate handle etc and look for it to suck the smoke in.

 15 
 on: June 18, 2018, 05:27:33 AM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by E Yoder
I don't understand how you guys are getting by without boiling over in the summer. I was very meticulous at sealing the firebox and ash door with silicone and still had to bleed some heat off with a pair of 100 cfm fans across a heat exchanger in the shop. The first idea I had was to trigger the main hx fan with a temp controller, but the garage gets HOT, and very quickly when closed up. If left on I'd say the heat would build up to 140+ on a hot day? - just an educated guess.

So with the two small fans there is enough bleedoff to prevent overshoot under normal conditions with any type of wood. I'm content with the design, the shop doesn't get over 110 like this. Tonight the shortcomings were apparent. After a reload I checked the ash drawer and closed it back up. The lip that seats in the drawer seal wasn't seated completely, offset just a little. This created a considerable air leak.
You guys have it figured out I think, there's got to be air leakage. Ashpan and firebox doors need to pinch down tight. Enough to compress the gasket. Check fan/ solenoid for leakage. The extended chimney creates more of a vacuum, probably a 1/4" hole could cause boiling. Wonder if teeing the chimney right above the stove could break the vacuum?
Should never creep over 10°, no matter what the heat load or outside temps.
I'm assuming there is a pump running at all times to stir the tank?

 16 
 on: June 17, 2018, 07:57:09 PM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by mlappin
You could try lowering your set point as well, I wouldn’t lower it too much given its a mild steel stove but you could try 10-20 degrees and see if that helps.

 17 
 on: June 17, 2018, 04:42:16 PM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by greasemonkoid
Gotcha.


Sealed off the grate lever slot and added the plate. Hope something good comes of it. I sweated off a gallon of water doing that job.


Thanks for the help.  :)



 18 
 on: June 17, 2018, 02:04:36 PM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by RSI
They didn't have the water jacket around the chimney then. It shouldn't hurt your stove, just lower efficiency and more likely to overheat.

 19 
 on: June 17, 2018, 12:42:45 PM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by greasemonkoid

The older wood model stoves had the grate all the way to the back and it would burn the bottom the of chimney pipe off and lose a lot more heat out the chimney.



That's a nice thought. Hope nothing got damaged...  :o

 20 
 on: June 17, 2018, 12:20:32 PM 
Started by greasemonkoid - Last post by RSI
You mostly just want to keep air from going straight up the chimney.
The older wood model stoves had the grate all the way to the back and it would burn the bottom the of chimney pipe off and lose a lot more heat out the chimney.
The put a solid floor in the back half to fix that problem.

If it is possible, I would remove the back shaker grates. I never looked at them that close to see how hard that would be. The guy from Nature's Comfort told me it works ok to just lay it on top.

1/4" plate should work fine. You could experiment with holes but I think you want the air to mostly come from the front of the firebox

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