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Author Topic: Radiant walls  (Read 297 times)

E Yoder

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #15 on: May 07, 2018, 05:06:47 AM »

I would fish the supply and return lines through behind the drywall, yes. But as for running the loops vertically, what would be the advantage to that? I want the heat down low if anything, and getting transfer plates stuck behind finished drywall would be near impossible. Maybe I'm not understanding what you're saying, but I feel like horizontal is the way to go in my case?
I wasn't thinking you would use transfer plates with 160į water. Just heat up the air space with pex. I was thinking oval vertical loops crossing over the studs once to minimize the chance of hitting it with a nail.
Just ideas. No big deal.
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RSI

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2018, 06:39:58 AM »

That would probably work ok on inside walls but seems like you would have a lot of heatloss if you run 160 degree water in an outside wall. I would think on outside walls you would want to use transfer plates and keep the temp as low as possible. Also, probably a good idea to put a radiant barrier behind the transfer plates to avoid losing too much radiant heat trough the wall.
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wreckit87

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2018, 02:17:16 PM »

That would probably work ok on inside walls but seems like you would have a lot of heatloss if you run 160 degree water in an outside wall. I would think on outside walls you would want to use transfer plates and keep the temp as low as possible. Also, probably a good idea to put a radiant barrier behind the transfer plates to avoid losing too much radiant heat trough the wall.

There's 2-3" of closed cell against the block and another 3" of air space behind the drywall, think the loss would be noticeable? The foam is always room temparature (and below grade, so ~55 degrees outside anyway), I guess I hadn't considered there being any noticeable loss to the exterior. Was kinda hoping whatever is lost through the plates would just convect up and warm the drywall above? Maybe I'm nuts
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mlappin

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2018, 08:38:01 PM »

Watching close.

Kicked my self when we remodeled the bedroom, should have installed ultra fin then, didnít hear of it till years later.

Still have the office to remodel, it shares a wall with our bedroom, Iím thinking place the pex, staple a layer of ply foil over the studs then cover the office side in drywall. The ideal of placing registers at the top and bottom also has merit. Fire stops are already in the walls and I tend to leave em, so only the bottom half of the wall would get heat anyways, Iíd also stay at least a foot off the floor as we have the tall baseboards.

If it works may redo the upstair bedrooms the same, a lot easier than tearing the floors up to place ultra fin in the joist bays. Ainít tearing the downstairs ceilings out just to install radiant, those were all over lays anyways as I wasnít about to pull lathe and plaster down in my face.
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RSI

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2018, 09:42:12 PM »

If you have 3" of air space I would put a layer of foil backed foam or bubble wrap against the foam. It doesn't cost that much and should reflect the radiant back into the room. I am guessing that the lower you can run the water temp, the less heat loss you would have without the radiant barrier. If you only end up needing to run 110 degree water then it may not make any difference.

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E Yoder

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2018, 06:13:12 AM »

Watching close.

Kicked my self when we remodeled the bedroom, should have installed ultra fin then, didnít hear of it till years later.

Still have the office to remodel, it shares a wall with our bedroom, Iím thinking place the pex, staple a layer of ply foil over the studs then cover the office side in drywall. The ideal of placing registers at the top and bottom also has merit. Fire stops are already in the walls and I tend to leave em, so only the bottom half of the wall would get heat anyways, Iíd also stay at least a foot off the floor as we have the tall baseboards.

If it works may redo the upstair bedrooms the same, a lot easier than tearing the floors up to place ultra fin in the joist bays. Ainít tearing the downstairs ceilings out just to install radiant, those were all over lays anyways as I wasnít about to pull lathe and plaster down in my face.
I have this idea floating around in my head that on a retrofit / remodel job you could cut the register holes and drill down through the bottom plates into the crawlspace and pull pex up into the wall cavity and back down. Then install the register covers and you'd have a convector in a room that didn't have good options otherwise.
I hope I'll have time this summer to build something like that and tie it into the lines in my shop just to see how much airflow would start rising up through the stud bay.
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mlappin

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2018, 11:25:55 AM »

Copper pipe would work even better.
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E Yoder

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Re: Radiant walls
« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2018, 11:41:03 AM »

Yes, but I wasn't sure how to get it inside the wall.   :)
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 12:01:46 PM by E Yoder »
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