Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Username: Password:
Pages: [1] 2

Author Topic: Wood Gasification Boiler Build  (Read 22666 times)

zimmer988

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« on: January 10, 2013, 03:41:28 PM »

A friend of mine and I are starting construction of a gasification boiler.  We plan on building it similar to the Portage and Main 250.  We are building it in SolidWorks first to test everything and make our .dxf files for the plasma table.  I will post some screen shots of what we have so far.  One of the things that I am confused about is building the nozzle in the floor.  I would like to make it replaceable.  Does anyone have pictures or ideas for me?  It seems very difficult to find information on the size and shape of the nozzle.
Logged

zimmer988

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2013, 03:59:59 PM »

 :pic:
Here's some screenshots of what we have so far.  Still a lot more work to do yet.  Just wanted to give you guys an idea of what we have in mind.  I will keep posting as the project progresses.
Logged

dwneast77

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 253
  • OWF Brand: Central Boiler; Wood Doctor
  • OWF Model: E-Classic 2300; HE10000
    • View Profile
    • HeatherWood Gardens
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2013, 07:54:26 PM »

That looks like a great start!!  The only suggestion I want to make is to move your primary air channel down closer to the floor, I'd say around 6" to 7" up.  For all the faults in the CB E-2300 that I have, I've recently come to a realization after 5 years.  Their original design had it down around 6" off the floor.  Problem was they did not make it cleanable.  I CAN'T STRESS CLEANABILITY ENOUGH!!!  My air channel deteriorated after only two to three years.  Last year (season 4) I had a welder help me with a new channel using pipe.  Air flow was no longer a problem, but my fire was too centralized around the nozzle and didn't burn well enough on the sides, thus bridging was a problem.  Also I got a lot of puffing (kind of like a backfire).  I actually had charcoal blast it's way out the chimney a few times as a result if you can believe that.  Boiler is located in a building with metal roof and I heard the coals land on the roof.  Freaky for sure.  I'll attach the picture of that design.  The second picture gives a little peak at the old channel.  If you look close you can see all the build-up of ash and creosote inside the old channel.  Sadly, like I explained earlier the new channel did not produce a stable fire. 

So I decided to try another change, but I have not taken a picture of it.  I came in through the back wall like before with a 2" nipple to a verticle"T" with a bushing at the bottom so there is still a drain for creosote (very important to consider) and some air can blow from there also.  Short nipple up to another horizontal "T", sized down to 1 1/4",  then pipe to each side and elbows forward along each side.  I ran the channels up on top of the old channel for support.  First I tried it with my outlet holes aiming mostly downward instead of straight outward like they had it, thinking this would also allow for creosote drainage.  Problem with this was it burned the coals right out from under the wood.  So I aimed the holes up some, not all the way.  Basically at or just above the nozzle area.  This thing is burning better than ever!!  Good consistent fire, clean with very little smoke and minimal bridging issues.

The guys I've seen on here with the P&M 250 seem very happy with performace of those units.  I've never seen one so I don't know how much it differs from the CB E-2300 design.  The way I see it with my unit having the lower air channel is that it puts a nice even flow of air over the whole coal bed.   

Good luck with your planning and building.  Looks great so far.  Keep us all posted!!

[attachment deleted by admin]
Logged
Eastern Maine (near Calais)
Central Boiler E-2300
Wood Doctor HE10000
Stihl 290 Farmboss
Craftsman 27 ton Splitter
JD 870 Tractor

zimmer988

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 05:36:00 PM »

Thanks for the tip.  I will move the air tube down to just above the angle in the firebox.  I made the air tubes flanged so that they would be cleanable, replaceable, and easily modified.  I do not plan on welding them up against the firebox wall but maybe just have them sit on top of some tabs welded to the firebox.  I also have them running through a larger tube so that the tube that would be in contact with the boiler water would not also be in contact with the smoke and creosote to help prevent rusting through to the water jacket.  How often will the air tubes need to be cleaned?  More than once a season?  I have 2" square tubes in the drawing but maybe round would be better.  Are the under fire air tubes prone to creosote buildup too?  I plan on burying them in refractory cement.
Logged

dwneast77

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 253
  • OWF Brand: Central Boiler; Wood Doctor
  • OWF Model: E-Classic 2300; HE10000
    • View Profile
    • HeatherWood Gardens
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2013, 08:34:50 PM »

I've never heard of anyone having trouble with buildup in secondary air tubes.  Just a little dust here and there.  Never been a problem for me.  To help with primary tube build-up, I'd put a couple of holes in the bottom of the tubes.  A good place for a drain is near the back just inside the firebox.  I'm wondering if it's partially caused by condensation on the air tube since relatively cool air is flowing through there, but I get a lot of creasote/tar buildup around my back wall.  Although, that is also the farthest wall from the fire as my burn favors the front of the stove so I stack the wood as close to the door as possible.

It's hard to say for sure how fast it could plug up.  With the new air channel I built from pipe, I used 2 bushings to drop from 2" down to 5/8" I think.  After a week or maybe a week and a half, I pulled the channel out to inspect it and found the drain was plugged and was built up to the air inlet hole.  So I removed one bushing leaving about a 1" drain and it is working great so far.  I have not had it back out to inspect again since, however.
Logged
Eastern Maine (near Calais)
Central Boiler E-2300
Wood Doctor HE10000
Stihl 290 Farmboss
Craftsman 27 ton Splitter
JD 870 Tractor

BoilerHouse

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
  • OWF Brand: Home Built
  • OWF Model: Fire Tube/Water Tube
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2013, 04:19:15 AM »

I have 2" square tubes in the drawing but maybe round would be better.

I am not sure how dirty the tubes would get with your design but there is bound to be some loose deposits.
I would think round tubes would be better because it would be easier to source a round brush to clean them.
Logged
Muskoka, Ont

Scott7m

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3740
  • OWF Brand: Heatmaster
  • OWF Model: E Series
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2013, 10:04:30 AM »

Def use round tubes
Logged
Dealer for:  Heatmaster, Empyre, Earth, Ridgewood, and Woodmaster outdoor furnaces
Furnace Parts Dealer
Pelican water treatment systems
606-316-9697

zimmer988

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2013, 11:48:29 AM »

Thanks for all the great tips!  We have designed quite a bit more on the boiler, but we only get work on it for a few hours once a week after work.  We changed the top of the firebox to have 45 degree corners and the bottom has 60 degree. I am going to change the 2" square tubing to 2" pipe and add another one so that there will be one at the top corner and moving the existing one down to the bottom corner.  I will leave the floor air the same.  This will give me some flexibility on how I can bring air into the firebox.  With my flanges, I will be able to seal one off if not needed.  Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it as I always say.  After we get a bit further, I will post more pictures.
Thanks again everyone!!
Logged

blackslacks

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2013, 08:07:58 AM »

Looks like a great project.  I'm in the process of building pretty much the same thing.  I had my fire box rolled and i put a flat bottom in it.  I'm going to be using threaded pipe for the air so it can be removed for cleaning or replacement if needed.  What size tubing you using for the exchanger?  I was thinking 2 x .120 for the verts and 1.5 x .120 for the horizontals.  I was originally going to use pipe but all I could find was sch 40 which is a little heavy for efficient heat transfer.  Good idea you have there with the air tube inside a larger one through the water jacket. .  I also am a little confused on the nozzle.  I like the firebrick idea some on here suggested.  Simple and cheap. Keep us posted.
Logged

dwneast77

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 253
  • OWF Brand: Central Boiler; Wood Doctor
  • OWF Model: E-Classic 2300; HE10000
    • View Profile
    • HeatherWood Gardens
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2013, 08:09:55 PM »

I managed to get a few pics of my new primary air channel in my CB E-2300.  As long as I keep the drain hole clear so creosote can drain out it is burning great!!!

[attachment deleted by admin]
Logged
Eastern Maine (near Calais)
Central Boiler E-2300
Wood Doctor HE10000
Stihl 290 Farmboss
Craftsman 27 ton Splitter
JD 870 Tractor

zimmer988

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2013, 09:03:17 PM »

Here's some more pics of the boiler.  We are almost finished.  Just making up the .dxf files for the plasma table and generating parts drawings.  The water jacket is 4 ft x 4 ft x 8 ft tall.  Not sure on the total water volume yet.  I will have to calculate all of the internals.



[attachment deleted by admin for space issues]
Logged

jthornton

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2013, 05:35:48 AM »

Looking good! Will you share the SolidWorks files when your done?

John
Logged

CRJR

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 105
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2013, 03:13:29 PM »

i would also be interested in the file when complete if possible
Logged

zimmer988

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 16
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2013, 06:34:38 AM »

I will probably post it for you guys to use but I will not be responsible for any errors.
Logged

jthornton

  • Training Wheels
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Wood Gasification Boiler Build
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2013, 06:51:31 AM »

That is fine with me and thanks for sharing. Mainly I'm interested in looking at your design from different view and such and being able to open the 3D model up in SW makes that easy.

John
Logged
Pages: [1] 2