Outdoor Wood Furnace Info

All-Purpose OWF Discussions => Fire Wood => Topic started by: kommandokenny on February 09, 2016, 09:26:25 AM

Title: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 09, 2016, 09:26:25 AM
Guy selling wood nearby.
No info in the add, but upon prodding him for info, I find the logs were a year old and it was split last week.
I believe its mixed hardwood, mostly Maple.
Is this properly seasoned, or does it not have to sit for 6 months to a year, before burning.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: Bondo on February 09, 2016, 09:45:31 AM
Ayuh,....    If the logs were felled last year, that's when it started dryin',.....

A moisture meter would tell ya for Sure,...

Personally, if I can see checkin' in the ends of the splits or rounds, it's dry enough for me,...
If the bark easily falls off, that's another sign it's pretty dry,...
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: hondaracer2oo4 on February 09, 2016, 11:18:48 AM
Big difference if the wood was in log length or cut to length but not split. If it was log length until last week it has likely lost little to no water content, IE 40+% moisture content. If it was cut to length but just never split I would say its probably around 30%.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: juddspaintballs on February 09, 2016, 12:09:11 PM
What kind of maple?  There's a big difference in BTU's available between Silver Maple and Norway or Red Maples
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: MScott on February 09, 2016, 03:49:59 PM
Type of wood makes a big difference. In my experience, Hard (sugar) maple and Ash will burn well with little or no seasoning. I have burned both from freshly cut, green trees. Others will take longer. Oak needs a minimum of 1 year after splitting, probably better after two. Elm, hickory, soft maple, apple, cherry, basswood, poplar and ironwood need several months. Even pine, which you would expect to burn easily, needs several months after splitting. JMO
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 09, 2016, 05:14:48 PM
Thanks guys.
Not enough info in the add.
I emailed them questions and they were vague.
I believe the wood was in log length , blocked and split last week.
I imagine it's for next winter but they don't say.

I guess a moisture meter is the answer here.


I'm not buying this wood, but am trying to figure out the business for myself.






 
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: Pointblank on February 09, 2016, 06:34:26 PM
If your looking for something to burn in a conventional owb, it might work, but if your looking for well seasoned wood, (20-25% MC), your more than likely looking at next year before its ready to burn unless it was standing dead when it was logged. Logs piled up on the ground dont dry very well. In my experience, it takes cutting and splitting to get it dried down. 
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 10, 2016, 06:15:53 AM
If your looking for something to burn in a conventional owb, it might work, but if your looking for well seasoned wood, (20-25% MC), your more than likely looking at next year before its ready to burn unless it was standing dead when it was logged. Logs piled up on the ground dont dry very well. In my experience, it takes cutting and splitting to get it dried down.

Thats what I think is going on here with this add.
If the wood is a little green, it's gonna burn in a conventional .
It's not gonna burn well in a little  fireplace, or someones elmira cookstove.
May create extra creosote in the house chimney.







Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: BoilerHouse on February 11, 2016, 08:15:12 AM
I got a load of logs Jan 2015 - mainly hard maple.  I blocked/split them and put them in a huge outdoor pile in October 2015.  They are noticeably greener and heavier than the split wood that has been in my wood shed since last spring.  So I would say you are getting the equivalent of unseasoned wood.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 11, 2016, 06:43:13 PM
Yes thats what I'm thinking.
I'm going out to look at it.
It's in Sundridge,, Boiler
KK










 

Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: BoilerHouse on February 11, 2016, 08:30:56 PM
This is the time of year when I usually get a load of logs - 9 full chords. They come out of the bush nice and clean. Trouble is I have enough on hand for next year and even some for the year after.  It's a high quality problem, so I am on the fence.  (Although our wood piles will be dropping this weekend - LOL)
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 12, 2016, 11:30:27 AM
If ya got the room might as well stock up.
I guess it can get to a point where its too dry,though?
I've got wood for next year, split and stacked in the leanto.
I also have 20 face cords I want to sell, but I don't think I can call them seasoned and get the xtra coin for it.
That's why I originally posted.
That's why I'm trying to figure out what other people are selling now. [Feb.]
I will let my wood sit and dry and flog it in September.
That will be a whole year split and drying.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: Bondo on February 13, 2016, 05:47:08 AM
Quote
I guess it can get to a point where its too dry,though?

Ayuh,....    There's no such thing as wood that's too dry to burn,....
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: mlappin on February 13, 2016, 06:39:39 AM
Quote
I guess it can get to a point where its too dry,though?

Ayuh,....    There's no such thing as wood that's too dry to burn,....

Long as you have enough heat exchange area in your boiler that is.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 13, 2016, 07:55:38 AM
Quote
I guess it can get to a point where its too dry,though?

Ayuh,....    There's no such thing as wood that's too dry to burn,....

There is an optimum moisture content however

http://woodheat.org/firewood-too-dry.html
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: BoilerHouse on February 13, 2016, 11:20:04 AM
I once bought a load of logs for a wood stove in the house, blocked and split them, then elected not to use that stove.  I didn't burn that wood until 10 years later when I built and installed the outdoor stove I use now.  It was dry to say the least but not rotten.  I thought it burnt fine. 
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: kommandokenny on February 14, 2016, 07:22:24 AM
As long as it burns and heats our houses!
The conventional s aren't picky ,,,I burn everything.
Try not to waste anything I cut.
The deer are thanking me now ,,,,lots of yummy tiny treetops in the bush
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: patvetzal on March 06, 2016, 06:05:43 PM
For the first ten years we were here, most of our wood was oak tops that the loggers had left before we bought the place, with some deadfalls and trail clearing logs thrown in. A few years ago I started cutting live trees but last year it went into the woodshed too soon and now it has black mold on the ends of the maple and birch. Started to check, but still not as dry as I like.
I hate the thought of piling it outside to dry, then moving it into the woodsheds for the winter....
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: patvetzal on March 05, 2017, 09:00:01 AM
Winter of 2015-16 was a light year for wood so last summer our tenant decided that 12 bush cord in the woodsheds should be lots. I then piled some fresh cut maple logs in the barnyard and let the snow cover it.
By the end of January I was buying wood so we cut the ice covered logs during Feb and piled them by the OWB, mostly unsplit but covered by a tarp.
Now I am 72 yrs old with bone cancer so my tenant is supposed to feed the furnace as I can only lift 10 lb.
I can however bring down skids of dry wood (we have about a bush cord left) with the tractor and set them beside the OWB to use for "kindling".
Experience has shown that once the fire is up to temp, I can toss in a few smaller green sticks during the day and the temp stays at 180F.
Tenant has decided that the proper way to operate is to fill the stove only  twice a day, early morning and 6-7pm. By this time the last load has burnt down and the water temp is dropping. By noon, the water is down to 90deg and the green wood has just started to burn so by 3-4pm the water temp is back up. The wood is pretty well gone by 6-7 when he fills it up with frozan wood again.
Each time he finds that the new wood doesnt burn very well, he shovels out most of the glowing coals in the bottom so the "air can get thru" (the air feed in my P&M is up thru the ash tray). This of course removes a lot of the heat that would dry out the maple, but 4-5 hrs later the wood has started to burn anyway.
Both of the houses have airtight fireplace/stoves as well as the new OWB but two years ago (their first winter) they found that they could not heat their house with it (we had used it as a sole heat source for 8 years) so now they refuse to light it as "any heat goes up the chimney". They just cannot understand how our house can be so warm when we light our airtight. Must be because we only burn it in the evenings........

How do you argue with a citiot?
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: mlappin on March 05, 2017, 11:39:30 AM
You donít argue with him, heís a tenant loading your stove and using your airtight, tell him this is how itís done, period.

I do NOT put up with farm help not doing the job the way they are told to, whether itís because they think they know better or thatís how Dad, Grandpa or their uncle always did it, your using my stuff on my property, this is how it WILL be done.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: aarmga on March 06, 2017, 11:24:51 PM
Type of wood makes a big difference. In my experience, Hard (sugar) maple and Ash will burn well with little or no seasoning. I have burned both from freshly cut, green trees. Others will take longer. Oak needs a minimum of 1 year after splitting, probably better after two. Elm, hickory, soft maple, apple, cherry, basswood, poplar and ironwood need several months. Even pine, which you would expect to burn easily, needs several months after splitting. JMO

I couldn't agree more with this post. I can burn sugar maple or Farland the day that I cut it. I cut some down in October split it and put it right in the woodshed, and it burned excellent.   Some of the black walnut that I had cut in October I threw a few pieces in and it does not burn good at all. I would say that needs to sit cut and split for at least one year, because the Rounds aren't even dry after one year of sitting. Some of the oak I cut 24 inches long will still be 35% after a year of sitting.  I say if it wasn't split and stacked for one full season then it ain't ready.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: patvetzal on March 08, 2017, 04:14:46 PM
In this case he sort of has me by the short curlies and tells me to do it myself, which I can't for health reasons. Last winter things were OK but this winter he feels he knows best. If we get an early start to filling the woodsheds, (12-15 bush cord) it won't matter, as next winter he will only have dry wood to burn,
If we don't start filling the woodsheds by the end of blackfly season then I will be getting someone  to do it who realizes the difference.
In his defense, he is out there at 7am stoking the furnace and does all his cutting with his own saws.
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: patvetzal on March 10, 2017, 03:20:07 PM
There is a difference between burning and burning well to produce heat. Our woodsheds were getting low so during the past few weeks we cut a half dozen maple/poplar/ash that were alongside the driveway. I was all set to skid them up to the barn and bring down dry wood but was told to drop them at the OWB where they would get cut up. Since some of the stems were 12" in diameter I offered to bring down the hydraulic splitter. Again I was shot down as my helper had a new maul....
That wood is going into the furnace with minimal splitting, and it is burning, but it takes 3-4 hours before it gets hot enough the produce much heat. During this time the water temp drops to 110/130 degrees on a cold day.
I figure that about 40% of the BTU's is just being used to boil off the ice covering and internal moisture.... :'(
Title: Re: Whats properly seasoned wood?
Post by: patvetzal on November 10, 2017, 01:19:02 PM
our new tenant throws some dry wood in maybe twice a day. and as long as the water temp stays 160-170 we are both happy. pieces are too big for me to handle but he likes them.... ;D